Fasano says yes to gluten sensitivity

Fasano says yes to gluten sensitivity

Dr Alessio Fasano on gluten sensitivity

Professor of Pediatrics, Alessio Fasano is a leading researcher of celiac disease in the USA.  His team gave a medical presentation at NAPSGHAN Scientific Meeting, Salt Lake City, Oct (2007), with the title: “Role of the Innate Immune System in the Pathogenesis of Gluten Sensitivity: Preliminary Results”. In this paper they clearly show that gluten sensitivity is a real entity. Some of the immunological mechanisms have now been demonstrated. Gluten sensitivity (in contrast to celiac disease) does not involve the loss of intestinal barrier function. This gives unequivocal support to the Gluten Syndrome. Fasano says yes to gluten sensitivity

Full article at this link here:  Fasano Gluten Sensitive research

Details about Prof Fasano can be found here: http://www.umm.edu/doctors/alessio__fasano.html

His books

Clinical Guide to Gluten-Related Disorders eBook“,  Dr. Alessio Fasano MD: Kindle Store.

An excerpt from the Amazon site says “A Clinical Guide to Gluten-Related Disorders provides primary health care providers the succinct material they need to immediately evaluate and support their patients. Gluten-related disorders have a wide presentation, and this text covers the recognition, evaluation, and multi-disciplinary approach to the management of disease. Readers will benefit from the general overview of gluten intolerance and from the common sense approach to developing treatment and dietary plans. Clinical vignettes offer clinicians real-life scenarios to help put the disease and its treatment in context for their patients.”

and

Gluten Freedom” by Dr. Alessio Fasano

An excerpt from the Amazon site says “World-renowned gluten-related disorders expert Dr. Alessio Fasano presents the groundbreaking roadmap to a gluten-free lifestyle, and how millions can live better by going gluten free. For centuries, bread has been known as the “staff of life.” But for millions of Americans affected by gluten-related disorders, consuming gluten, the complex protein found in wheat, rye, and barley, can be hazardous to their health. In a recent poll presented by Scientific American, over 30% of Americans reported wanting to cut down or eliminate gluten from their diets; the gluten-free market is a $6.3 billion industry and continues to expand.”

http://www.amazon.com/Gluten-Freedom-Essential-Gluten-Free-Lifestyle/dp/1118423100

Alessio Fasano on gluten sensitivity  He says: “Gluten is a weird protein. We don’t have the enzymes to dismantle it completely, leaving undigested peptides that can be harmful. The immune system may perceive them as an enemy and mount an immune response.”  So I argue, if gluten is the enemy (for ALL people) – why are we still serving it up to people!?

My quip is “All it needs is an excellent replacement for wheat and the other gluten grains.”

Fasano says yes to gluten sensitivity

Fashion says: “We’ve shown now that gluten sensitivity actually exists. It’s moved from a nebulous condition that many physicians dismissed to a distinctly identifiable condition that’s quite different than celiac disease,” Fasano explains. “Gluten sensitivity affects six to seven times more people than celiac disease.  Read more here

Prof A Fasano is Professor of Pediatrics University of Maryland Medical Center, USA. His team presented this paper at the NAPSGHAN Scientific Meeting, Salt Lake City, 26 Oct 2007. Title: “Role of the Innate Immune System in the Pathogenesis of Gluten Sensitivity: Preliminary Results”

This research group has clearly shown that gluten sensitivity is a real entity. They have discovered some of the immunological mechanisms caused by gluten.

Prof A Fasano is Professor of Pediatrics Medical Director, Center for Celiac Research UM Center for Celiac Research Pediatrics: Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition. University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC). Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201

His team presented this paper at the NAPSGHAN Scientific Meeting, Salt Lake City, 26 Oct 2007. “Role of the Innate Immune System in the Pathogenesis of Gluten Sensitivity: Preliminary Results”

Anna Sapone1,2, L. Imbrici1,M. Cammarota1,M. Guiliano1, M. DeRosa1,M. Carteni1, C. Tolone1, A. Papparella1, G. Paolisso1, V. Familiari1, L. DeMagistris1, A. Fasano2. 1Second University of Naples, Napoli, Italy; 2University of Maryland, Baltimore.

Background: Reaction to gluten can involve allergic (wheat allergy), non-allergic [gluten sensitivity (GS)], or autoimmune [celiac disease (CD)] mechanism. Recent evidences suggest that early changes in intestinal permeability (IP) may play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of CD also through a Toll-Like Receptor signalling pathway (TLRs) involvement. Conversely, no data are currently available on the role of intestinal barrier dysfunction in the pathogenesis of gluten sensitivity.

Aims: To investigate the changes in IP, TJ protein genes expression and TLRs in gluten sensitivity.

Methods: Biopsy were obtained from12 gluten sensitive patients, 24 patients with active CD, 3 patients with CD in remission, and 14 healthy controls. TJ gene expression of Claudin (CL) 1, CL2, CL3, CL4, ZO-1 and of TLR1, TLR2 and TLR4 were investigated by Real-time PCR. IP was evaluated by means of the lactulose/ mannitol test (LA/MA).

Results: CL4 expression was increased threefold in gluten sensitivity subjects compared to both CD patients and healthy controls, while no changes in CL1, CL2, CL3, and ZO-1 expression were detected. IP in GS patients (0.014_0.015) was similar to that detected in healthy controls (0.019_0.018). Conversely, in CD patients an over-expression of both CL1 and CL2 was observed and was associated to an increase in IP (0.052_0.048). TLRs expression was measured in a random subgroup of CD (N= 10), GS (N = 4) patients and normal subjects (N= 4). TLR1 resulted significantly increased in CD in respect to the gluten sensitivity and normal controls (P<0.05), while an over-expression of TLR2 and TLR4 was detected in both CD and gluten sensitivity groups compared to normal controls.

Conclusions: These results show that the pathogenesis of gluten sensitivity is different from that of CD and does not involve the loss of intestinal barrier function. The over expression of TLRs in CD and gluten sensitivity could suggest an important role of innate immune system in both conditions.

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My comment: This research group clearly shows that gluten sensitivity is a real entity. Some of the immunological mechanisms have been demonstrated. Gluten sensitivity (in contrast to celiac disease) does not involve the loss of intestinal barrier function.

(NAPSGHAN, North American Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition)