Egg Allergy – when will it go away?

Dr Rodney Ford on YouTube

Dr Rodney Ford on YouTube

Egg Allergy – when will it go away? is a question I often get asked.
At the Childrens Clinic, we are often asked: When will this egg allergy go away?  Will my child ever outgrow egg allergy?  Well, the good news is that the answer is “yes!” In our studies we found that eight (80%) out of ten children with egg allergy become tolerant to egg by four or five years of age, and certainly by six years of age.  But still, there are two (20%) out of every ten children with egg allergy where it persists into late school, high school and maybe to adulthood.  So the answer is:  “Yes, most children do grow out of their egg allergy (80%) – but some persist through into adulthood.”  Children mostly do out grow egg allergy.

Egg Allergy – when will it go away?

For the majority of children, their egg allergy will resolve by 3-5 yrs of age. Your doctor can determine if your child has grown out of their egg allergy by a combination of skin prick testing, EAST (RAST) tests, and food challenge with egg.  Im my clinic I repeat the skin tests every 6 months for the first few years than every  1-2 years. A positive skin test to egg does not always mean your child will have symptoms when they eat egg, therefore a cautious challenge may be the only way to determine if your child has grown out of their egg allergy.
Challenges need to be done carefully, but can be done at home, unless your child is super-sensitive. The step-wise introduction of egg is safe.

Does egg avoidance in the first year prevent an egg allergy?

No! Egg avoidance is not recommended.  There seems to be a window of opportunity for foods such as egg to be introduced – between 4-8 months. Early introduction of egg, in small amounts, might help induce tolerance.

A breastfed baby, with mother eating egg, will be exposed to small fragments of egg – that might either lead to tolerance or egg allergy.

In high-risk infants, egg avoidance by the mother may be necessary if the baby is developing eczema.

Children with a history of an egg reaction often start tolerating small amounts in cooking after two years.

By Dr Rodney Ford +