Eczema. Missing the food allergy diagnosis

Severe eczema food allergy

Severe eczema food allergy

Today, in my clinic, I have seen 5 children with severe eczema. The distressing thing that stands out, to me and their mothers, is that ALL of these children had only been offered moisturizers and steroid creams for their eczema. The standard health professional message was: “you will grow out of it”.  Not one of these children had been given a diagnosis of food allergy. But they all did.

Eczema. Missing the food allergy diagnosis

I have reviewed the literature examining the link between eczema and food allergy: it is compelling. Skin prick tests can easily identify most of the food allergens that precipitate eczema in babies.  Health professionals seem universally to ignore this fact. For example, one of their GPs said to my patient, “we don’t do those sorts of tests”.
By contrast, in my Clinic, 80% of children with eczema (especially around the cheeks, chin and face) have food allergy. I am very disappointed when I next see a child at review if they do not have beautiful skin.
Here is the link to my review of eczema and food allergy.  http://www.thechildrensclinic.co.nz/eczema/food-allergy
Dr Rodney Ford writes: “Food allergy is extremely common. However, most doctors will not consider food allergy in their diagnostic list – only as a last resort.  But symptoms are often treated in isolation, without understanding underlying causes.  Often symptoms are attributed wrongly to viral illness.  A community study looked at the difficulties faced by children in getting a diagnosis of cow’s milk allergy. It took an average of 18 community doctor visits to make the eventual cow’s milk allergy diagnosis, and average time to diagnosis was 4 months.  Surely, as it is so common, food allergy should be a routine item on every doctor’s (including dermatology) diagnostic list. If so, these children would get prompt diagnosis and treatment.”
by Rodney Ford